Posts Tagged ‘Ballycastle’

More sketchbook drawings, dancing from page to page…

December 18, 2011

I love working in my sketchbooks.  No pressure I just hop, slide, move, dance from one page onto the next, following my train of thought. Making drawings from observation, rubbing them out drawing over them, playing with ideas. Thinking I’ll try that or I wonder what would happen if. It is the best way of visual thinking.  The excitement, waiting to see what things will look like, knowing  it doesn’t matter if it works or not because it is about finding out, opening doors not closing them.   Taken from one of my Ballycastle sketchbooks which is full of drawings of Main Street, this little group of drawings started with a  sketch of a derelict notice board, plywood streaked with rain-water stains.  They then started absorbing the narrative of  earlier drawings of the horizon and the cracks in the pavement of the same street..

 

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Sketchbook drawings from Ireland

December 4, 2011

Spent a couple of days scanning in pages from some of my Balinglen Sketchbooks to send to someone.  A boring chore but actually it was lovely to look again at those images and remember the when the where the light the weather and the things I had forgotten about. Realised there are some many ideas here that I want to take further.

The unstable horizon from a small boat in wild seas

December 6, 2010

 

During my two residencies in Ireland this year I worked extensively in sketchbooks.  In Ballycastle my house faced the sea, nothing between me and Greenland, and every morning I drew the rapidly changing horizon, the light, the weather, and the mountains of Donegal appearing and disappearing like ghosts. At The Cill Rialaig Project on the Kerry coast  there was nothing between the wild rocks and America apart from the Skelligs, inhabited in the fourth century by a group of monks. For them their location was the edge of the known world. I went out to the Skelligs in wild March seas in a ferociously bronco-bucking, little fishing boat and once there, climbed to the top. Two of the scariest things I have ever done! The sketchbooks full of horizon drawings, the drawings from the cliffs in the Ballinskelligs, the memory of my trip to the Skelligs and getting to know the local people in Co. Mayo has translated itself into a body of work concerned with Unstable Horizons. They reference the physicality and history of the land and my experience of it as well as the uncertainty of the economic and political situation in Ireland, which is also part of my family history.  These small paintings are the beginning of a determined exploration of these ideas and I am already working on two larger canvases.